The new normal – legally speaking

So much has changed in our day-to-day lives since “corona” became part of our vocabulary that it’s easy to believe that everything is different. So has this crisis fundamentally changed your legal rights in the Netherlands? Our legal experts summarise what you need to know.

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Settlement agreements – what you need to know

As more and more companies move towards reorganisations and redundancies, voluntary leave programmes and settlement agreements are becoming a common topic of conversation. So what should you do if you are offered a settlement agreement? Is it worthwhile accepting, and what are the consequences? Here are some essential considerations.

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9 Myths about Dutch law – busted

Truth or fiction? Our legal experts dispel some common misunderstandings about Dutch law.

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Mind the gap

When it comes to migration law, following the correct process is the best way to prevent problems. One common problem is a residence gap: an interruption of your continuous stay in the Netherlands. In practice, once you have a residence gap the damage is done; there is seldom a cure.

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Reorganisation and redundancy in the Netherlands

Employees in the Netherlands enjoy strong legal rights. They can only be dismissed for a limited number of reasons (grounds). One such reason for dismissal is redundancy for business economic reasons, for example during a company reorganisation. This article explains the process employers must follow and why a settlement agreement can be easier than dismissal via UWV procedure.

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Losing your job in 2020 – key considerations

There’s not much worse than facing dismissal, except perhaps for losing your job now in the current crisis. Companies are failing, jobs are scarcer, and just getting to an interview is more complicated. As an expat, the threat to residence makes this an even bigger issue. So, if the worst happens, here’s what you need to know about your legal rights and options.

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Dismissal law in the Netherlands 2020

Dutch employment law has changed in 2020. With the introduction of a new act, the grounds for dismissal in the Netherlands have expanded. Here’s what you need to know.

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6 FAQ about coronavirus and work, home and business

The media is dominated by so much information about the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) that it’s hard to keep track of what it means in practice. Here are some clear answers to frequently asked questions about coronavirus and employment, property and business according to Dutch law.

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Say goodbye to shorter working hours – the WTV is discontinued

On 17 March 2020, the Dutch cabinet announced that the WTV scheme for shorter working hours has been discontinued. Instead, employers affected by the coronavirus can apply for a new temporary measure designed to support employers, employees and entrepreneurs.

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New job? Do the 5 point check

Being offered a new job is exciting, especially when it provides the next step to your career. You may want to sign the new contract immediately to secure the deal – but before you do, take a moment to quickly check these 5 points. They are key to your future rights at work.

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Changing employment conditions

When an employer and employee sign an employment contract, both are bound by this contract, including the terms and conditions of employment. So what happens when an employer wants to change the employment conditions that were agreed?

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When to call a lawyer about work

As an employee, you may be confronted with an unpleasant situation at work, such as a conflict, demotion or change in your employment conditions. In such circumstances, it can be difficult to know how to respond. Read more

The seven things you need to check in your new employment contract

You’ve just got a new job, or perhaps you’re extending an existing position. You’ve just received a new employment contract. Before you sign your employment contract, there are some key clauses to which you should pay attention.

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Employee stock option rights and termination

Have you been granted employee stock options, and are you now facing termination of your employment? Discover 5 key points to consider that will help you understand your rights regarding your stock options.

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9 Ways to lose your job in Holland

As an expat, the most common reason to move to a new land is work – but which country will protect your rights in the workplace when you are there? Expat employment specialist Godelijn Boonman explains what makes the Netherlands a great choice for international workers.

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Why written notice is indispensable for employers

In a time when we accept VOIP calls, sound bites and instant messaging as standard work tools, it can be tempting to believe that a verbal discussion is sufficient – but this is not always true. In the case of ending a fixed term employment contract, written notice remains essential.

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Things to consider when confronted with dismissal

Even though the Dutch economy is growing again, many companies are still dismissing employees. Godelijn Boonman highlights the top 8 things to consider when confronted with dismissal.

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The non-competition or business relations clause

Many employment agreements contain a non-competition clause or business relations clause. Employees would usually prefer to not agree to such a clause but they want the job and don’t want to annoy their new employer, so they sign.

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Can your employer enforce a salary cut?

Can your employer enforce a salary cut? The good news is that, as a matter of fact, an employer cannot easily enforce such a measure.

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Employment contract: non-competition clause

The non-competition, or non-compete clause is a clause that can be included in an employment contract between employer and employee. This clause states that the employee is forbidden, both during his period of employment and thereafter, to be employed by or associated with a company that performs work or provides similar services to the business of the employer, and that therefore could be in competition with the business of the employer.

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Employee rights: more clarity on fair compensation

Since July 1 2015, under certain circumstances, employees have been entitled to fair compensation. A judgment by the Supreme Court in 2017 provided more clarity on how this compensation is calculated. This blog explains the situation in more detail.

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The Hague: international city of peace & justice

With the 100th anniversary of the Peace Palace the international allure of The Hague is very well visible. Besides the International Court of Justice and the Permanent Court of Arbitration, The Hague has another 200 international organisations, and 111 embassies and consulates.

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Dutch labour law and your contract of employment

Your employment contract may determine specific payment and work conditions, but Dutch law determines your rights as an employee in the Netherlands. There are a great many Dutch laws that apply, but some are especially relevant to international workers. Here are some expert tips on evaluating your employment contract under Dutch law.

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The do’s and don’ts of holidays

Are you trying to figure out how much time you can take off for Christmas? Or how to spend those final few vacation days you have left at the end of the year? Or, maybe you’re lucky, and you’ll have more holiday days then you need this year.

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Redeployment after a termination

In the Netherlands, employers must make an effort to reassign employees before they terminate them. But if you work for a large, multinational corporation, is your employer obligated to find a position for you anywhere in the world?

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Notice periods

 Any employment contract in the Netherlands must stipulate a notice period for ending the contract. That is the amount of time an employee must give an employer before leaving a position. Employees can be penalised for failing to adhere to the notice period requirements, so here’s what you need to know.

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Employee or contractor? Recent changes in the Dutch business climate

For companies who are deciding to establish an office in the Netherlands, the legal form of the business is important. Equally important are the people who are going to work for the company: does the company want to hire employees or contractors? These two are very different.

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Terminating an employee

Do you have an employee you would like to dismiss? In the Netherlands, an employer cannot unilaterally end an employment agreement unless both parties have agreed upon a temporary contract which ends by operation of law.

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Bonuses in severance pay

Are you an employee whose contract is being terminated and are you offered transitional severance pay? Then you might wonder how the amount of severance pay is calculated. An issue that has recently been brought into question is whether or not bonuses are included when calculating transitional severance pay.

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The proportionality principle in Dutch employment law

Dutch employment law strongly protects employees against dismissal. However, there are times when a termination is unavoidable. When a company reaches a point of economic deficiency where it is no longer possible to retain the same amount of employees, terminations will occur. There are a number of regulations covering the ways an employee can be terminated, one of which being the proportionality principle.

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Place of work determines applicable law

Which national law is applicable when it comes to international employment contracts? Is this the country of the employer, employee, or the country where the organisation is located?

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Further increase of the state pension age in the Netherlands

The state pension age, the age at which someone is entitled to the old-age pension facilitated by the state when you meet the requirements, is currently (in 2016) 65 years and 6 months. This age increases yearly, based on the increased life expectancy.

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The choice of law in the employment agreement

When parties conclude an employment agreement, they can agree that this agreement shall be governed by a law chosen by them. Such choice of law applies when the employment agreement is international in nature. When all connecting factors point to one country, the obligatory provisions of that country are not set aside by the choice of law in the contract.

Explicit and implicit choice of law

Usually, a choice of law is explicitly taken up in a clause in the international employment agreement. Nevertheless, a tacit choice of law is also possible. This must be clearly demonstrated by the terms of the contract or the circumstances of the case. Examples of such indications are: a jurisdiction or forum clause, and references to a section of law of a country.

The impact of the choice of law

When the international employment agreement contains a valid choice of law, this does not mean this law actually governs the whole contract.

First of all, the application of overriding mandatory provisions of the law of a country cannot be restricted. Important sections of Dutch law which are considered overriding mandatory provisions are provisions regarding working conditions, working hours, and minimum wage. These provisions apply irrespective of a possible choice of law when the situation falls within the scope of Dutch law.

Second, a choice of law may not deprive the employee of the protection afforded to him by obligatory provisions under the law that would have been applicable to the contract without the choice of law. Most of Dutch labour law consists of obligatory provisions, and, most important, Dutch dismissal law is fully mandatory. This means that even when the law of another country is chosen by the parties in the employment agreement, it is possible that (parts of) Dutch law applies as well.

In conclusion

When no choice of law clause is taken up in the contract, this does not necessarily mean no choice of law has been made. Furthermore, when a choice of law is agreed upon, this does not always exclude the applicability of (parts of) the law of another country.

Not sure about which law applies to the employment agreement? Contact us for advice.

Immunity of international organisations in labour disputes

Various international organisations are based in the Netherlands. These organisations enjoy a degree of immunity in order that they may remain independent and function without impediments.

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A work permit is valid in all EU member states

Recently the European Court of Justice gave an important judgment regarding the assignment of non EU-workers within the EU.

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Changes in Dutch employment law

Starting January 2015 a new Dutch employment law has been the source of many changes. This new law has a large effect on employment contracts.

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‘It’s my way or the highway’ approach costs employer small fortune

In the unlikely event you are faced with the dissolution of your employment contract because of (alleged) malfunctioning, it is good to know that judges might grant ample compensation when your employer lacks a complete personnel file of malfunctioning and has not given enough opportunity to improve yourself.

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Employment law: awarding a bonus

These days, a bonus is almost a standard component of an employee’s terms of employment. Employees view a bonus in the same light as a pension and compensation for healthcare costs. However, a bonus is different from holiday pay, which is a permanent and non-negotiable salary component.

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Expat employment contract means temporary contract?

In a 2013 case, a judge in Rotterdam decided that the expatriate employment contract under which a Cape Verdean employee performed work in the Netherlands, was a temporary employment contract. According to the judge, this expatriate employment contract was only a temporary addition to the permanent employment contract, which was concluded on Cape Verde.

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Preventing harmful behaviour in the workplace

Harmful behaviour in the workplace can occur at any level and at any moment – be it by co-workers, supervisors, employers or clients. Going to court is often the last resort. However, a lot can be done to prevent this from taking place in the first place.

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